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How Does an Air Conditioner works

An air conditioner works as a heat exchanger . It takes in warm air in your room and passes it over a set of cooling coil and then blows it back to the room as cold air. The cooling cycle of your air conditioner involves two basic processes: condensation and evaporation (you must have learned about them in school).

*** There are 4 important components in your AC that control the cooling cycle:

1- Compressor

2- Condenser coils

3- Evaporator Coils

4- Freon- Cooling agent

**Compression and condensation cycle

The coolant (mixed with lubricating oil*) enters the compressor as a cold low pressure gas where it is compressed. This compression increases the temperature and pressure of the coolant which converts it into a hot high pressure gas. 

This hot high pressure gas passes through a series of thin coil called condenser coil where it gets converted into a high pressure liquid. Whenever gas is converted into liquid heat is released. So the heat released during condensation of coolant is dissipated outside with the help of a condenser fan (located next to condenser coils).

**Expansion and evaporation cycle

This hot high pressure liquid then passes through an other set of thin coils called evaporator coils, where it gets evaporated into a low pressure gas. As the liquid changes to gas and evaporates, it extracts heat from the surrounding warm air of your room. 

So the air coming in contact with these coils get cooled and is blown back to the room with the help of an evaporator fan.

By the time the working fluid leaves the evaporator, it is a cool, low pressure gas. It then returns to the compressor to begin its trip all over again.

Difference Between Hot Working & Cold Working

Forming is the metalworking process of fashioning metal parts and objects through mechanical deformation; the workpiece is reshaped without adding or removing material, and its mass remains unchanged. Forming operates on the materials science principle of plastic deformation, where the physical shape of a material is permanently deformed.

Hot working:-

Hot working refers to processes where metals are plastically deformed above their recrystallization temperature. Being above the recrystallization temperature allows the material to recrystallize during deformation

Cold working:-

Cold working is the plastic deformation of metals below the recrystallization temperature. In most cases, such cold forming is done at room temperature. & Hot working refers to processes where metals are plastically deformed above their recrystallization temperature. Being above the recrystallization temperature allows the material to recrystallize during deformation....

Pistol Section Components

pistol is a type of handgun. Some handgun experts and dictionaries make a technical distinction that views pistols as a subset of handguns; others use the terms interchangeably. Sometimes in usage, the term "pistol" refers to a handgun having one chamber integral with the barrel.....

Hydraulic Shovel Components

Hydraulic shovels have a similar capacity range, but use hydraulics and a forward or backhoe loading motion to dig into the ore being excavated.Electric rope shovels, with bucket capacities ranging from 20 m3 to over 100 m3, raise and lower the bucket using large cables attached to powerful electric motors.....

Mechanism Concept

mechanism :- 

is a device designed to transform input forces and movement into a desired set of output forces and the movement. 

Mechanisms generally consist of moving components such as gears and gear trains, belt and chain drives, cam and follower mechanisms, and linkages as well as friction devices such as brakes and clutches, and structural components such as the frame, fasteners, bearings, springs, lubricants and seals, as well as a variety of specialized machine elements such as splines, pins and keys.

Geneva Mechanism :-

The Geneva drive or Maltese cross is a gear mechanism that translates a continuous rotation into an intermittent rotary motion. The rotating drive wheel has a pin that reaches into a slot of the driven wheel advancing it by one step. The drive wheel also has a raised circular blocking disc that locks the driven wheel in position between steps.

Ratchet & Pawl Mechanism :-

ratchet is a mechanical device that allows continuous linear or rotary motion in only one direction while preventing motion in the opposite direction. Ratchets are widely used in machinery and tools. Though something of a misnomer, "ratchet" is also often used to refer to ratcheting socket wrenches, a common tool with a ratcheting handle.

A mechanism is usually a piece of a larger process or mechanical system. Sometimes an entire machine may be referred to as a mechanism. Examples are the steering mechanism in a car, or the winding mechanism of a wristwatch. Multiple mechanisms are machines.

Comparison Between Grease & Oil

Oil and grease is a measure of a variety of substances including fuels, motor oil, lubricating oil, hydraulic oil, cooking oil, and animal-derived fats  The concentration of these substances is typically measured within a body of water. Lakes, river, stormwater runoff, and wastewater are all monitored for oil and grease....

Space Shuttle Components

Shuttle components included the Orbiter Vehicle (OV), a pair of recoverable solid rocket boosters (SRBs), and the expendableexternal tank (ET) containing liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen. The Shuttle was launched vertically, like a conventional rocket.... 

Conventional Suspension

Conventional Suspension is the system of tires, tire air, springsshock absorbers and linkages that connects a vehicle to its wheels and allows relative motion between the two. it serve a dual purpose contributing to the vehicle's handling and braking for good active safety and driving pleasure.....

Internal Car Components

This is a list of automotive parts mostly for vehicles using internal combustion engines which are manufactured components of automobiles......
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